"the life-changing magic of tidying up" by Marie Kondo

In October, I was introduced to a brilliant website called Blogging for Books.  I was quite excited.  I would be allowed to choose a title to read, free of charge, in exchange for a posting a book review on my blog.  Isn’t that a brilliant idea?

I quickly found my first title:  “the life-changing magic of tidying up” by Marie Kondo.  It was touted as an international best seller, having sold over 2 million copies.  The cover of the book is beautiful, and very Zen.  Much as I would expect from a book with “the Japanese art of decluttering and organizing” as a subtitle.

"the life-changing magic of tidying up" by Marie Kondo

“the life-changing magic of tidying up” by Marie Kondo

In October, I spent a few days in the hospital due to a port-a-cath infection which basically threw off my entire month.  And there was a shipping glitch at Blogging for Books that delayed the receipt of the book.  So, I didn’t actually start to read it until November.

I had high hopes.

If you have ever watched a video I’ve filmed in my office, you know I am not the neatest freak in geekdom.

I was looking for something within the pages that would inspire me to declutter permanently.  Here is a sample of what I did find:

“I visited the home of a client in her fifties…  when she pulled open her sock drawer, I could not suppress a gasp.  It was full of potato-like lumps that rolled about.  She had folded back the tops to form balls and tied her stocking tightly in the middle.  I was speechless.” (p. 80-81)

This is exactly how I organize my socks and stockings. I could only imagine the disapproving sounds the author would make when she opened my drawer.  My Korean grandmother made those noises.  I am quite familiar with them.

Here is another passage, this time about bathroom organization:

“I once bought a wire basket big enough to fit all the soaps, shampoos, and even facial masks used by my family.  My delight at this convenient item as short-lived…  One day I noticed that the shampoo bottle was red and slimy on the bottom.  Examining the rack, I saw that it was so covered in slime I could not bear to look at it.  Almost in tears, I scrubbed the wire rack clean…” (p. 157)

I am looking for decluttering tips, not a treaties on how to become OCD.

I could not finish this book and I do not recommend it.

I am very grateful to Blogging for Books for the chance to discover a technique that isn’t for me.  Maybe the clutter is just who I am?

You weigh in on clutter.  In or out?  How do you manage your piles?

Comments

comments

3 Comments

  1. Alana Reply

    I enjoyed your honesty. I wonder what that author would have done with my husband, when he returned from military basic training. Underwear folded in thirds. Socks rolled in balls. I drew the line at him and his friends on the living room floor, polishing their shoes with water and cotton balls. Fortunately, he returned to normal after a couple of months. If the health department isn’t worried about my housekeeping, I am not, either. Sorry, I wouldn’t have finished that book, either!
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  2. Susie Reply

    I think your office looks fine in your videos. And I’m thankful you posted this review. As The Busy Woman, you know that I am a time management and organizing guru, but that doesn’t mean my home is in perfect order. It also doesn’t mean that I thought all of my clients should have perfect homes. On contrar! I lived with a family member who was OCD. There are things I like and don’t like about it. But I digress…

    If the way you have things set up works for you and you know where your things are, then it’s no problem. If you want to learn to tidy up a bit or keep things neat and tidy after you clean or organize, that is an entirely different issue.

    A solution to keeping things neat and tidy after cleaning and organizing requires routine and habits that become automatic. Everyone has an opinion. It’s finding the right solution for your personality type that matters, not what someone else does or says we should do, but I know you know that.

    We should do another video on solutions. There’s not really an all or nothing solution. It’s gradual progress… until the next life change comes. Then you have to start all over again.

    I loved this review because it was honest and didn’t play to the crowd. I thought it was going to be another, “This book is the greatest and if you read this book it will save your life,” type of review. So THANK YOU! I love your honesty!!!

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