5 Leadership Skills Every Employee Needs

Many jobs require that employees be “team players.” You may hear that so often that it becomes meaningless. But it isn’t – being a team player is a fairly broad term, and it can include an important attribute that employers appreciate: leadership.

Being a leader in the workplace does not necessarily mean being a boss, manager, supervisor, or other “official” position, although it can mean that. Being a leader in the workplace can also mean setting a good example for others and/or heading up office programs and projects.

Here are some tips and ideas on how to be a leader in the workplace.

Be Confident

There’s a saying that can serve you well in the workplace: “Never let them see you sweat.” Of course, no one is perfect; but appearing confident inspires others to trust you and take your advice. One way to ensure that you appear self-assured is not to talk too much about your fears and concerns. Talk to friends outside of the workplace about your uncertainties.

See the Good in Others

Being able to see the good traits in others is a useful leadership trait in the workplace. If you need to put certain people in charge of certain tasks, it pays to know who will do well with what task. You also may see potential in a co-worker and “stretch” him or her by requesting a task that might be a bit challenging. This improves the overall skill set of the workforce, and helps build self-esteem in your co-workers.

Don’t Be Afraid to Delegate

There’s a difference between being a people person and being a people pleaser. Being a people person means you have a genuine love for people, but you’re not afraid to ask people to do things. Being a leader doesn’t mean just doing everything yourself; it means you are comfortable giving up some control and delegating tasks to others.

Appreciate Co-Workers

No one wants to work for or with someone who doesn’t appreciate them. If you let everyone know you appreciate what they’ve done and how they’ve given their time and talents, it can go a long way. It’s always good to remember that there would be no leaders if there weren’t any followers. People who are appreciated may be more likely to follow your lead next time.

Problem Solving

If you step up with ideas on how to solve dilemmas, problems, and so forth, and have resourceful ideas about how to accomplish something, then speak up. Employers value the ability to think through a problem and find a creative solution. This is a valuable leadership quality.

4 Keys to Being an Effective Leader

It is time to step in to leadership.  Perhaps you are going to be training a group of adults for a specific vocation, or perhaps you have to organize a community consignment sale. Maybe you need to find volunteers for a work or church function. There are all kinds of situations where adults need to lead adults. Here are some keys to being an effective leader of your fellow adults.

Know Where You’re Going

No one wants to follow someone who has no idea where they’re going! Having a goal or vision is essential. It’s possible that it may evolve or change as you go forward – it’s good to be flexible, too – but when you start out, having a clear vision can inspire others to follow you. If you really believe in it and know it can be done, your enthusiasm tends to be infectious. People like to get on board with someone who knows where to steer the ship!

Listen

As noted above, it’s good to be flexible, and that’s where listening comes in. As you express your vision and goal, even if it’s just getting things done well and on time, it’s a good idea to listen to the input of others. Someone might point out something you hadn’t taken into consideration, or he/she might have a good point about your choice of venue.

Obviously, a good leader can’t please every person’s whim, but you can take people’s concerns into consideration. If everyone seems to be saying the same thing, maybe you should change your plans a bit! People tend to appreciate a leader who listens, even if it doesn’t always mean change.

Clear Steps

In addition to a clear goal, you’ll need clear steps on how to reach that goal (or multiple goals). Explaining a “contagious” vision is great, but teaching people how you plan to realize that vision is important. It can seem unrealistic if you don’t explain your plan. Break it down into doable steps, and present those to those in your group. A big part of this, of course, is being organized.

Confidence

If you don’t believe in what you’re doing, no one else will, either! Make sure you are confident and certain of your plan and your goals. Sources agree that it’s not a good idea to be overly confident to the point that you don’t listen to anyone or heed their concerns; but confidence, like an exciting vision, is contagious. Be sure of yourself and what you want to accomplish.

Teaching Teens to Be Leaders

Leadership skills are important for all kinds of successes in life, from employment to relationships. And the general consensus is that such skills are lacking among adults and young people. Whether you have youth and young adults in your home or otherwise under your supervision, you can invest in their futures by teaching them how to be leaders.

Here are some tips for teaching youth and young adults to be leaders.

Give Them Responsibility

As a youth group leader, parent, teacher, or other authority figure, this can seem like a scary prospect. Are they ready for responsibility? Can they handle it? Give them something to be responsible for that will build their self-confidence, but don’t make it something that’s life-and-death. Take your teens’ personal skills, strengths, and weaknesses into consideration, too. Here are some examples of responsibilities for teens.

  • Running an errand for you, such as picking up something from the store. If they can’t drive, you can drop them off to run the errand.
  • Opening up a bank account.
  • Let them lead a class or group.
  • Household chores like laundry could be delegated to the young adults and teens in your home.
  • Have them organize the set-up and clean-up of an event.

Jobs

One of those ironies of good leadership is that being under leadership is often a great way to learn it. Youth and young adults would do well to work at least part time, thus learning responsibility and also learning what is involved in good leadership. Having a job is an important responsibility that can prepare young people to lead.

Consider jobs like camp counselor or babysitter, too. Those are both jobs that put young people in charge of others.

Workshops

Are there leadership workshops available in your area? If not, see if you can hire a leadership consultant to come in and speak to your group. Maybe you can find someone to speak to your teen’s class, or hold a seminar on your young adult’s college campus. If there is a workshop available, take your youth group to the workshop, or sign your kids up.

Groups and Organizations

Organizations like Boy and Girl Scouts are also good ways for young adults and youth to learn leadership skills. Don’t let the names “boy” and “girl” deter you – there are all kinds of opportunities in these organizations for youth and young adults. Other clubs and groups encourage leadership among members, too. Find out about what is offered in your community – even your local YMCA/YWCA might have some ideas or programs.

30 Years in Business with Nothing to Show for It

Big day today.

We turned over the keys to the warehouse that served as our furniture studio for over 16 years, to the landlord.   My husband spent the past 30 years as full-time professional furniture maker. When we married, we became business partners, as well as, spouses.

Shane made beautiful custom furniture for the homes of movie stars, country music superstars, Fortune 500 executives across the United States plus a few exotic locations like the Bahamas and Panama.  Our clients will enjoy their handcrafted furniture for years to come, as it was built to last for generations.

We, however, have nothing to show for the decades of hard work we put in to building our brand and our product line.  Once we finish liquidating our assets, we will never receive another penny from all that work.

We also own a network marketing company and today we hit a milestone in that business.  I told you it was a big day.

For the past several weeks we have packed and purged and moved out of the furniture studio.  We haven’t had a lot of time for other things.  I have helped my network marketing team in small pockets of time, mostly via text message. However, I have not been working that business all that much.  And yet, we hit this financial milestone today.

With our custom furniture business, if I wasn’t hustling sales and Shane wasn’t crafting furniture, we weren’t making money.

Our network marketing business keeps sending us checks, every month (or week) because we did the work 5 years ago, or 5 weeks ago.  We did the work once, we keep getting paid.  That’s called residual income.

Now that we are (almost) done closing the furniture studio, I can spend more time teaching folks how to earn residual income, because it is rewarding.

Today I also realized just how much our furniture business owned our lives.  Our networking marketing business makes our lives fun.

Today was a big day.

8 Brilliant Leadership Lessons from “The Boss”

Bruce Springsteen demonstrates everything, I mean EVERYTHING, you need to know about leadership in just under 9 minutes during a 2013 concert in Germany.

Almost everyone knows Bruce Springsteen is “The Boss,”  a nickname acquired in the early stages of his career for serving as paymaster for his band after gigs.  He may not have liked the moniker at the beginning, but he certainly owns it today.  Heck, even Prince admired Springsteen’s band leadership.

Leadership Lessons from Bruce Springsteen

An audience member in Leipzig, Germany, challenged Springsteen to play “Never Can Tell,” a song his band had never played together.  After consultation with lead guitarist Steven Van Zandt, experimentation with a few different keys, and eventually switching guitars, The Boss was ready to teach the song to the band.  As he coached the E-Street Horns, he invited the audience to take part, until everyone was singing along.  When he was confident the band was ready, he launched into the song, asking members of his band to show off their command of the melody one by one.  It is a toe-tapping display of brilliant leadership in just under 9 minutes.

 

Let’s recap the 8 brilliant leadership lessons in this 9-minute Bruce Springsteen music video:

  1. Say Yes to Challenges
  2. Experiment and Collaborate
  3. Use the Best Tools and People
  4. Coach Your Team and Cheer Them On
  5. Get Everyone Involved
  6. Launch at the Right Time
  7. Trust Your Team and Let Them Shine
  8. Have Fun

C’est la vie!

Source: http://en.newsner.com/crowd-asks-springsteen-to-play-another-singer-s-song-his-response-leaves-them-speechless/about/music

How to Drive more Organic Traffic to your Facebook Business Page

Back in March of 2016, over 16 months ago, I recorded this video and started writing this blog post sharing a few organic traffic tips gleaned from April Williams, Creative Brandista, at the Find Your Vibe to Attract Your Tribe Personal Branding Live Workshop I hosted the previous month.

As a result of implementing a few of April’s tips, over 11,000 people saw posts from my Facebook business page over a 7 day period.

 

In a nutshell, here are 3 big takeaways:

  1. Keep your business page and your personal profile separate.
  2. Use your real name, not the name of your direct sales or network marketing company,or your business page.
  3. Set up your business page as a “public figure.”

Of course, doing those three things won’t drive traffic to your Facebook page.  You have to create compelling content that gets shared.  In my case, I created a heart-felt call to spend Leap Day in service to others that created a small buzz.

Chemo Update

On a side note, I am so happy to have reclaimed most of my eyebrows after chemo made my hair fall out!  What a difference 16 months makes.  I’m not so thrilled about having to shave my legs again.

It is actually kind of groovy finding all these almost finished blog posts in my drafts.  There are 18 other partially written posts in there that can be updated and tweaked.  Chemo is a great excuse to be a slacker.  Though I still receive intravenous Herceptin treatments every three weeks, I can no longer claim chemo as an excuse, since the treatment I am receiving now doesn’t have the brain-fogging can’t-get-out-of-bed side-effects of Abraxane.  So, I will just be an excuse-less slacker if I don’t turn those drafts into awesome posts.

3 Tips to Stay Off Facebook So You Can Work on Your Business

If your social media posts are lacking engagement, you could be posting too much, according to nutrition business blogger Ruthann Giordano.  Staying at about 1 to 2  posts per day, 5 days a week is ideal as post engagement dropped dramatically after 2 posts per day.  So, if you really want to improve engagement on your business posts on Facebook, get off Facebook and get to work on your business.  Here are some tips that might help:

  1.  Use scheduling software life Buffer, Hootsuite, or my favorite, TinyTorch.  I like TinyTorch best because it allows me to post to Facebook events and groups.  For you direct sellers out there, imagine being able to throw a Hostess Party without doing any work.  Yeah, TinyTorch is the app for that.  Your first $10 is on me when you use this link.
  2. Uninstall the Facebook App from your phone.  Bahahaha.  Right.  But hey, use the right app for your business.  You should use the Facebook Pages app to post to your business page.
  3. Feeling lonely?  Leave your house and go to a networking event so you can meet and talk to real people.  GASP!

To recap, schedule your posts so you aren’t tempted to get sucked into the Facebook vortex, use the Pages app to post on the fly and interact with your audience, go meet people in person rather than cyber-stalking.